• Verbal – all words have different meanings/cultures

• Verbal – all words have different meanings/cultures. The choice of words that an individual uses is important depending on the individual you are talking to. When communicating, at times I need to ensure that I don’t use any jargon or abbreviations depending on the individual that I am talking to. It is also important to be an active listener.
• Non-verbal – facial expressions/body language, eye contact, tone of voice, pictorial. People’s emotions can be judged through their facial expressions and body language. It allows us to express our feelings and opinions using alternative methods to speech.
• Sign language/lip reading – instead of using sounds it uses visual signs. These are made up from using shapes, positions and movement of the hands and arms or body and facial expressions. Sign language and lip reading is mainly used by deaf or people who are hard of hearing. If an individual lip reads it is important that I am looking directly at them so they can view my lips and that the environment has correct lighting and reduced background noise.
• Written – written care plans, taking notes. They need to be clear/accurate and up to date.
• Electronic – easy & convenient way to keep in touch with other colleagues, management and professionals. Emails can be impersonal and can be mis-interpreted or misunderstood which can cause issues.
• Formal communication – can be used to show respect for others. It is often used when having a conversation with another professional individual for example: social care worker, district nurse or a doctor. It needs to be clear, correct and avoid misunderstanding. Communication with a manager is usually formal. A manager is usually more distant from those they manage so that if they need to, for example, issue a formal warning to someone, it is less awkward for both parties than if they are friends.
• Informal communication – is often used between individuals that know each other well such as family, friends and work colleagues
• Assisted communication – using communication aids or equipment such as: hearing aids, a word board or pictorial board.
• One-to-one communication – means one person communicating with another individual. This type of communication can make an individual feel relaxed.
• As with any communication it is important to find out which communication method an individual prefers and to offer support and respect their choice.