As
I researched Latin American composers, I came across a woman by the name of
Cacilda Borges Barbosa, who is noted as one of the most influential Latin
American composers of the twentieth century, which is absolutely incredible.
Cacilda was born in Rio de Janeiro on May 18, 1914, which is interesting
because that happens to be the same year that World War I started. Cacilda
graduated from the National School of Music in Brazil, where she studied piano,
harmony and music theory. She focused mostly on modern and classical music
styles, where she created orchestra, choir and piano music pieces. Later in her
life, she came back to her Alma Mater, National School of Music in Brazil, and became
a chamber ensemble professor.

As
far as an example of her work, I found a piece that Calcilda composed, which
was called Triptico. Triptico is known to be a four-piece fugue, which is a “short
melody is introduced by one part and successively taken up by others”
(Dictionary). The piece was honestly not what I expected, but I was definitely impressed
with how it flowed together so smoothly. I was somewhat confused on what a
fugue was, but after listening to Triptico, it made so much more sense and was
a lot more noticeable. Cacilda made sure each part that was added was conspicuous,
but also meshed well with the music as it continued to play.   

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Cacilda
plays quite a significant role in Latin American music, and also
internationally. She is notoriously known for her work as a “Brazilian pianist,
conductor and composer,” and was also “one of the pioneers of electronic music”
throughout Brazil (Upclosed). Cacilda impacted many lives throughout her
lifetime, especially her students at the National School of Music in Brazil. In
addition, many of her pieces are still utilized to teach students. On August 6,
2010, Calcilda passed away in Brazil at the age of ninety-six years old. She
left behind an incredible legacy which made an everlasting impact not just in
Latin American music, but also internationally.