Exploring a decline in values. June Star is

Exploring the idea that all men are born sinners, O’Connordemonstrates immoral indulgences entertained by various characters. Readers areintroduced to grandmother, an elderly woman whose consistent unscrupulousbehavior exhibits her inner motives. Grandmother uses subtle, indirectconfrontation to get her way until she is faced with The Misfit, a runawaycriminal who believes that crime is a justifiable.

In “A Good Man Is Hard ToFind,” Flannery O’Connor uses characterization to display a loss of morals,imagery to portray evil in society, and symbolism to emphasize the struggle ofobtaining grace to prove how life is nihilistic without religion.Characterization is used not only to amuse readers, but toalso display an understanding of human nature, in this case a decline invalues. June Star is described as critical with a nasty motormouth. She is rudeto everyone surrounding her although adults seem to find her charming; “‘Ain’tshe cute?’ Red Sam’s wife said leaning over the counter. ‘Would you like tocome be my little girl?’ ‘No I certainly wouldn’t,’ June Star said. ‘I wouldn’tlive in a broken-down place like this for a million bucks!’ and she ran back tothe table.

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‘Ain’t she cute?’ the woman repeated, stretching her mouth politely.’Aren’t you ashamed?’ hissed the grandmother” (O’Connor 121). In life, thereare a multitude of ways to reply to various comments and she could have courteouslydeclined.

Her response allows her to be represented with an absence of respect.There is a universal code of law state that younger ones should respect theirelders and honor thy father and mother. June Star’s behavior does not followthis code. Bailey and his wife do not discipline her to correct her mistake(s),at the most the grandmother attempts to use guilty conscience to discipline herwhich has no effect. In contrast, when Red Sammy’s wife is insulted, she respondspolitely to the little girl showing her lack of values as well as discipline.This also displays her parents lacking ability to instill these values.

Furthermore,as the family diverts their trip to see a false house Grandmother mentions, theyget into an accident in which “the grandmother was curled up under thedashboard, hoping she was injured so that Bailey’s wrath would not come down onher all at once. The horrible thought she had had before the accident was thatthe house she had remembered so vividly was not in Georgia but in Tennessee…’Ibelieve I have injured an organ,’ said the grandmother, pressing her side, butno one answered her” (O’Connor 125). After getting into the accident, the veryfirst thing the grandmother does is to devise a plan to keep herself fromfacing the wrath of her son, Bailey.

That is very selfish and manipulative ofher to feign an illness rather the first thing she should have done was tocheck on everyone else’s well-being. Also, she should not have to fear the rageof her son because it is incorrect for a child to be disrespectful towardstheir parents especially in that type of situation. Bailey too, should check onthe well-being of his mother instead.

The sympathy that she looks for is notgiven which is good because no one will feed into her self-center internalrequest, however it is sad that none of her family members could check on herwelfare, especially since she is an elderly. The family’s ignorancedemonstrates their lack of care, a very important value. Temperaments given toboth characters express how their lack of religion affects them. Displaying the true intentions and feelings of characters,the author uses imagery to present thoughts and actions of malevolence inhumanity. The family stop at Red Sammy’s restaurant to get food and he and Grandmotherspark a conversation about society.

Red Sammy, just as Grandmother is shockedby the state of the world; “‘A good man is hard to find,’ Red Sammy said. ‘Everythingis getting terrible. I remembered the day you could go off and leave yourscreen door unlatched. Not no more.

‘” (O’Connor 122). The reminiscence ofunlocked doors and safety makes Red Sammy a bit nostalgic. That previous way oflife is calming yet in the present because one can not do that, it signifiesevil in society. People like The Misfit make the world unsafe and evolves the peacefulimage of leaving your screen doors unlocked into one of fear. Religion teachesthat stealing and/or harming other is unacceptable but evident as the storyprogresses that the characters do not practice their respective religionscausing destruction to increase. The Misfit has deeply thought about religionand gives and ultimatum rather than broad option on the interpretation ofreligion. In doing so, The Misfit wants to believe in God but chooses not to; “‘Jesuswas the only One that ever raised the dead,’ The Misfit continued, ‘and Heshouldn’t have done it.

He thrown everything off balance. If He did what Hesaid, then it’s nothing for you to do but throw away everything and follow Him,and if He didn’t, then it’s nothing for you to do but enjoy the few minutes yougot left the best way you can—by killing somebody or burning down his house ordoing some other meanness to him. No pleasure but meanness,’ he said and hisvoice had become almost a snarl.” (O’Connor 132). The Misfit’s ideals embodypure evil, particularly in his talk of how Christ threw off the balance oflife. His talk of the validity of Christ’s miracles is way to justify hiswrongdoings.

Stating that if Christ raised the dead then people should followhim, but if not they are free to explore anarchy. He also says that the bestway to spend your last minutes is to harm other which he will possibly do.However, not in his last minute does he cause harm rather in the last minute ofothers does he harm them. The Misfit’s inability to live by faith causes him tobecome dangerous. In any religion, faith in the creator aids in positive productivitybut the lack of faith The Misfit has allows him to be consumed by suchmalicious ideals. Once one brakes away from the normality of society to enterdemolition, there is very little space within the person for internalrejuvenation.

Using symbolism, readers are able to decipher the pathcharacters take as they journey to find favor, which some will achieve andothers will delay. The Misfit and his crew are approaching the site of theaccident. Grandmother saw a vehicle coming in their direction in which she franticallywaved her hands and “the car continued to come on slowly, disappeared arounda bend and appeared again, moving even slower, on top of the hill they had goneover. It was a big black battered hearse-like automobile.” (O’Connor 125-26). Thecar is a representation of both the grandmother and the Misfit.

Just as the carcomes slowly up the hill, so does both characters as they slowly ascend to findgrace. Being a hypocritical religious person, criticizing others andmanipulating them, the grandmother uses these actions to favor her. These actionsdelay her from finding favor, although the Lord will forgive one’s sins, itdoes not mean that one can commit them repeatedly. The grandmother disappears onthat path to freedom when she exudes these actions but reappears again when shelearns of her mistakes, especially while conversing with the Misfit. Thatconversation propels her into favor through death. As the Misfit graduallyascend to the grace, it is very difficult for him to obtain due to his constantirrational actions. He disappears from the face of God and consistently doeswrong. Only will he reappear when he relieves himself from his lack of faith.

Thebelief that wrong is wrong and that he should not be doing it will increase hisjourney towards mercy, and his ability to maintain and carry out that mentalitywill be the deciding factor of whether he obtains his grace. The lastconversation Grandmother has causes her to change her ways. Along with the confrontationwith death allowing The Misfit to know that Grandmother “‘would have been agood woman,’ The Misfit said, ‘if it had been somebody there to shoot her everyminute of her life.'” (O’Connor 133). The realization that the grandmother hasreceived grace represents that she too was like the Misfit, a sinful person,and now she has entered a society where she can become a new and free person.This partially applies to the Misfit, in that he connected with the grandmother.He realized his atonements but unlike grandmother does not do much to changethem or correct himself causing him to struggle even more with obtaining hisgrace.

He keeps himself from being new and free person. Ending the story in a momentof grace, O’Connor changes the dynamic of not only the story but of thecharacter, Grandmother, as well as evolves the character, The Misfit, and addsdeeper dimensions to his characterization.In using references to religion to reveal the evolution of Grandmotherand Misfit, O’Connor exposes a how unreal life would be without religion.Religion shapes thoughts as well as character and without the human dispositionstarts crumbling.

The world gains disrespectful children like June Star andfugitives like Misfit. As well as, one’s chances of reaching the heaven oreternal paradise becomes difficult to acquire. Deprived of religion, a nihilistsociety would be established, a society where inhabitants will no longer beable to distinguish iniquity and will not feel guilty for partaking in any act.Exploring the idea that all men are born sinners, O’Connordemonstrates immoral indulgences entertained by various characters.

Readers areintroduced to grandmother, an elderly woman whose consistent unscrupulousbehavior exhibits her inner motives. Grandmother uses subtle, indirectconfrontation to get her way until she is faced with The Misfit, a runawaycriminal who believes that crime is a justifiable. In “A Good Man Is Hard ToFind,” Flannery O’Connor uses characterization to display a loss of morals,imagery to portray evil in society, and symbolism to emphasize the struggle ofobtaining grace to prove how life is nihilistic without religion.

Characterization is used not only to amuse readers, but toalso display an understanding of human nature, in this case a decline invalues. June Star is described as critical with a nasty motormouth. She is rudeto everyone surrounding her although adults seem to find her charming; “‘Ain’tshe cute?’ Red Sam’s wife said leaning over the counter. ‘Would you like tocome be my little girl?’ ‘No I certainly wouldn’t,’ June Star said. ‘I wouldn’tlive in a broken-down place like this for a million bucks!’ and she ran back tothe table. ‘Ain’t she cute?’ the woman repeated, stretching her mouth politely.’Aren’t you ashamed?’ hissed the grandmother” (O’Connor 121).

In life, thereare a multitude of ways to reply to various comments and she could have courteouslydeclined. Her response allows her to be represented with an absence of respect.There is a universal code of law state that younger ones should respect theirelders and honor thy father and mother. June Star’s behavior does not followthis code. Bailey and his wife do not discipline her to correct her mistake(s),at the most the grandmother attempts to use guilty conscience to discipline herwhich has no effect.

In contrast, when Red Sammy’s wife is insulted, she respondspolitely to the little girl showing her lack of values as well as discipline.This also displays her parents lacking ability to instill these values. Furthermore,as the family diverts their trip to see a false house Grandmother mentions, theyget into an accident in which “the grandmother was curled up under thedashboard, hoping she was injured so that Bailey’s wrath would not come down onher all at once. The horrible thought she had had before the accident was thatthe house she had remembered so vividly was not in Georgia but in Tennessee…’Ibelieve I have injured an organ,’ said the grandmother, pressing her side, butno one answered her” (O’Connor 125).

After getting into the accident, the veryfirst thing the grandmother does is to devise a plan to keep herself fromfacing the wrath of her son, Bailey. That is very selfish and manipulative ofher to feign an illness rather the first thing she should have done was tocheck on everyone else’s well-being. Also, she should not have to fear the rageof her son because it is incorrect for a child to be disrespectful towardstheir parents especially in that type of situation. Bailey too, should check onthe well-being of his mother instead. The sympathy that she looks for is notgiven which is good because no one will feed into her self-center internalrequest, however it is sad that none of her family members could check on herwelfare, especially since she is an elderly. The family’s ignorancedemonstrates their lack of care, a very important value. Temperaments given toboth characters express how their lack of religion affects them. Displaying the true intentions and feelings of characters,the author uses imagery to present thoughts and actions of malevolence inhumanity.

The family stop at Red Sammy’s restaurant to get food and he and Grandmotherspark a conversation about society. Red Sammy, just as Grandmother is shockedby the state of the world; “‘A good man is hard to find,’ Red Sammy said. ‘Everythingis getting terrible. I remembered the day you could go off and leave yourscreen door unlatched. Not no more.'” (O’Connor 122). The reminiscence ofunlocked doors and safety makes Red Sammy a bit nostalgic. That previous way oflife is calming yet in the present because one can not do that, it signifiesevil in society.

People like The Misfit make the world unsafe and evolves the peacefulimage of leaving your screen doors unlocked into one of fear. Religion teachesthat stealing and/or harming other is unacceptable but evident as the storyprogresses that the characters do not practice their respective religionscausing destruction to increase. The Misfit has deeply thought about religionand gives and ultimatum rather than broad option on the interpretation ofreligion. In doing so, The Misfit wants to believe in God but chooses not to; “‘Jesuswas the only One that ever raised the dead,’ The Misfit continued, ‘and Heshouldn’t have done it. He thrown everything off balance.

If He did what Hesaid, then it’s nothing for you to do but throw away everything and follow Him,and if He didn’t, then it’s nothing for you to do but enjoy the few minutes yougot left the best way you can—by killing somebody or burning down his house ordoing some other meanness to him. No pleasure but meanness,’ he said and hisvoice had become almost a snarl.” (O’Connor 132). The Misfit’s ideals embodypure evil, particularly in his talk of how Christ threw off the balance oflife. His talk of the validity of Christ’s miracles is way to justify hiswrongdoings. Stating that if Christ raised the dead then people should followhim, but if not they are free to explore anarchy.

He also says that the bestway to spend your last minutes is to harm other which he will possibly do.However, not in his last minute does he cause harm rather in the last minute ofothers does he harm them. The Misfit’s inability to live by faith causes him tobecome dangerous. In any religion, faith in the creator aids in positive productivitybut the lack of faith The Misfit has allows him to be consumed by suchmalicious ideals. Once one brakes away from the normality of society to enterdemolition, there is very little space within the person for internalrejuvenation.

Using symbolism, readers are able to decipher the pathcharacters take as they journey to find favor, which some will achieve andothers will delay. The Misfit and his crew are approaching the site of theaccident. Grandmother saw a vehicle coming in their direction in which she franticallywaved her hands and “the car continued to come on slowly, disappeared arounda bend and appeared again, moving even slower, on top of the hill they had goneover. It was a big black battered hearse-like automobile.

” (O’Connor 125-26). Thecar is a representation of both the grandmother and the Misfit. Just as the carcomes slowly up the hill, so does both characters as they slowly ascend to findgrace. Being a hypocritical religious person, criticizing others andmanipulating them, the grandmother uses these actions to favor her. These actionsdelay her from finding favor, although the Lord will forgive one’s sins, itdoes not mean that one can commit them repeatedly. The grandmother disappears onthat path to freedom when she exudes these actions but reappears again when shelearns of her mistakes, especially while conversing with the Misfit. Thatconversation propels her into favor through death.

As the Misfit graduallyascend to the grace, it is very difficult for him to obtain due to his constantirrational actions. He disappears from the face of God and consistently doeswrong. Only will he reappear when he relieves himself from his lack of faith. Thebelief that wrong is wrong and that he should not be doing it will increase hisjourney towards mercy, and his ability to maintain and carry out that mentalitywill be the deciding factor of whether he obtains his grace. The lastconversation Grandmother has causes her to change her ways.

Along with the confrontationwith death allowing The Misfit to know that Grandmother “‘would have been agood woman,’ The Misfit said, ‘if it had been somebody there to shoot her everyminute of her life.'” (O’Connor 133). The realization that the grandmother hasreceived grace represents that she too was like the Misfit, a sinful person,and now she has entered a society where she can become a new and free person.This partially applies to the Misfit, in that he connected with the grandmother.He realized his atonements but unlike grandmother does not do much to changethem or correct himself causing him to struggle even more with obtaining hisgrace. He keeps himself from being new and free person.

Ending the story in a momentof grace, O’Connor changes the dynamic of not only the story but of thecharacter, Grandmother, as well as evolves the character, The Misfit, and addsdeeper dimensions to his characterization.In using references to religion to reveal the evolution of Grandmotherand Misfit, O’Connor exposes a how unreal life would be without religion.Religion shapes thoughts as well as character and without the human dispositionstarts crumbling. The world gains disrespectful children like June Star andfugitives like Misfit. As well as, one’s chances of reaching the heaven oreternal paradise becomes difficult to acquire. Deprived of religion, a nihilistsociety would be established, a society where inhabitants will no longer beable to distinguish iniquity and will not feel guilty for partaking in any act.