In the play when Hamlet meets with the Captain of Fortinbras’ army the captain addresses Hamlet with a sympathetically forbearance tone

In the play when Hamlet meets with the Captain of Fortinbras’ army the captain addresses Hamlet with a sympathetically forbearance tone. It may seem as if the captain know of the plan of Fortinbras to invade Denmark instead of Poland since he mention that they were fighting for a “little patch of ground that hath in it no profit but the name.” Which could be referring to the land King Hamlet won from King Fortinbras but the captain is restraining himself to tell the truth of the invasion to Hamlet as it’ll destroy their plan
Hamlet’s attitude towards the situation was fill with disgust as he said “This is th’ impostume of much wealth and peace, That inward breaks and shows no cause without why the man dies” Indicating that with the accumulation of wealth and peace will make the army seek for war. Due, to this fact Hamlet sees the immoral of the world and reacting with disregard.
Hamlet is flabbergasted by an army of “mass and charges” and was wondering if his nephew was able to amass an army of that size then why can he. Hamlet was comparing himself to Fortinbras and how Fortinbra was a “delicate and tender prince” is willing to go to battle through “what is mortal and unsure,” yet Hamlet who has “a father kill, a mother stained,” still could not kill Claudius. Hence, Hamlet was wondering whether or not he was doing things the right way.
Hamlet used Fortinbras’ actions to measure his own actions. Fortinbras took arms and is now leading an army to attack another country yet Hamlet is but one man who had many of his friends and even lover betraying him. Seeing how Fortinbras was able to accomplish such feat, Hamlet was determined that if his actions aren’t violent then he’ll consider them “nothing worth.”