n the book Sleuthing The Alamo

n the book Sleuthing The Alamo, Crips tries to explain and unravel the myths about the history of the Texas Revolution. He brought light on the account about racism and political correctness that had been hidden by culture wars in the past two centuries. Crips explain the history of his youth with the help of the experiences that he had in his childhood while in Texas, where he shows evidence of distorted documents, collected and ignored reports which had hidden the voices of the Texan in the past. James continues to unravel the reasons that led to archiving the documents that relate to the Texas past including the three eyewitnesses to the death of Davy Crockett at the Alamo (Crip, 118)
The original version of the book that Jmaes wrote about was initially known as the Texas un Seine Revolution which was an account of the Texas Revolution written by Herman Ehrenberg and published in 1843. The book was later translated to English and edited by Bartholomae then later actively edited by Charlotte Churchill with Milam and Fannin in 1935. Even though Bartholomae’s translation was the first translation for the Ehrenberg version from German, there were many hidden and skipped things, and Professor James Crisp considered it to be an incompetent translation. It was incompetent because, during Bartholomae’s translation for his master’s thesis, there were no professors from the foreign language department in the graduation committee to avoid the omission of essential parts (Crip, 144).