Nail salons are mostly small businesses that employ or contract with trained professionals to provide clients with nail services including

Nail salons are mostly small businesses that employ or contract with trained professionals to provide clients with nail services including, but not limited to, nail filing and polishing, artificial nail application, and other hands- and foot-care treatments. More than 375,000 nail technicians working in salons across the United States face possible health hazards every day. Workers exposed to chemicals found in glues, polishes, removers, emollients and other salon products may experience negative health effects such as asthma and other respiratory illnesses, skin disorders (e.g. allergic contact dermatitis), liver disease, reproductive loss, and cancer. Additionally, workers often endure muscle strains from awkward positions or repetitive motions; and have a high risk for infection from contact with client skin, nails, or blood.
Products used in nail salons may have chemicals in them that can harm health. Chemicals can get into the body if a person breathes in vapors, dust, or mists from the products or if you get the product on your skin or in your eyes; or swallow the product if it gets on your uncovered food, drink, or cigarettes. Chemicals affect different people in different ways. How a chemical effect on a certain depends on how much he is exposed to. He can get sick right away, or he can get sick over time. Exposures can “add up,” especially when many products are being used at the same time when the products are used day after day, or when there is poor ventilation in the salon. If a person is using chemicals all day, every day, he is more likely to get sick than someone who uses the same chemicals once in a while.