Some groups have argued that state traffic laws make legislation regulating cell phone use unnecessary

Some groups have argued that state traffic laws make
legislation regulating cell phone use unnecessary. Sadly, this is not
true. Laws on traffic safety vary from state to state, and drivers
distracted by cell phones can get off with light punishment even
when they cause fatal accidents. For example, although the midshipman
mentioned earlier was charged with vehicular manslaughter
for the deaths of John and Carole Hall, the judge was unable to
issue a verdict of guilty. Under Maryland law, he could only find
the defendant guilty of negligent driving and impose a $500 fine
(Layton C1). Such a light sentence is not unusual. The driver who
killed Morgan Pena in Pennsylvania received two tickets and a $50
fine–and retained his driving privileges (Pena). In Georgia, a
young woman distracted by her phone ran down and killed a twoyear-old;
her sentence was ninety days in boot camp and five hundred
hours of community service (Ippolito J1). The families of the
victims are understandably distressed by laws that lead to such
light sentences.