The debate and documentation on states and governments to join in the promotion of CSR policies started in the 1990’s with few states buying into that idea

The debate and documentation on states and governments to join in the promotion of CSR policies started in the 1990’s with few states buying into that idea. However, over the last decades there has been an increase in governments and states across the globe joining other stakeholders in playing an important role as promoters and drivers of csr policies. CSR has now become a subject of great political interest with governments being pressured by other stakeholders such as international bodies to find ways to address social responsibility efforts. Many states have now developed policies that echo international csr standards such as OECD Guidelines for multinational enterprises, UN Guiding principles, Global Reporting Initiatives Voluntary principles, United Nations Global Compact, Extractive Industries Transparency Initiatives and UN principles for responsible Investment.
Generally, incorporating CSR initiatives in a company’s business strategy is voluntary but there has been an ongoing debate on making CSR policies mandatory. Making csr policies mandatory means that governments are to enact measures, laws and regulations to monitor and control the operations of local and transnational companies.